Tulips

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One of the most popular spring flowers – the tulip has long been favourite of mine.

They mark the beginning of spring, longer, lighter days, and getting a bit of sun back!

They come in pretty much every colour you can imagine and there are actually over 3,000 registered varieties. It’s not just the colour variants, they come in various heights and flower shapes – some Tulips are even fragrant.

Fun fact: While we commonly call these flowers ‘Tulips’ their botanical name is not dissimilar: ‘Tulipa’

This stunning flower is known for having near symmetrical petals and tend to grow only one flower per stem. Each colour can mean something different, according to teleflora, so white to say you’re sorry, red for love, and surprisingly a multicoloured bouquet means you are fond of the recipients eyes. Who knew! Something else which surprised me on my tulip research – you can eat tulips much like you can an onion although when you realise they are both from the Liliaceae family it starts to make sense. You even make wine from them… umm I’ll stick with my glass of pinot noir thanks!

Tulips are also able to grow up to an inch while in a vase and will grow toward the light source – clever flower! But even so they are only the third most popular flower – roses taking the top spot!

So basically anyone looking to buy me flowers – you won’t go wrong with tulips in the spring…

  • For more information on Tulips and how to care for them visit rhs.org.uk
  • Or for information on the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation (who use the tulip as their symbol) visit pdf.org
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